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Exercise for Older Adults – TypeFree Diabetes

By July 19, 2018 Uncategorized

Exercise for Older Adults

 
Diabetes Exercises

Many older adults face challenges when it comes to staying active and healthy. As we age, our bones become more fragile, our muscles begin to weaken, and our stamina for sustaining physical activities lessens. All of these factors can lead to Diabetes complications and other health concerns. However, even though exercising may pose a bit of a challenge for many older adults, it is important to include physical activity as part of the daily routine.

Most older adults can manage to exercise at mild to moderate levels. For example,Older Adults Exercise while you may not be able to water ski or run a 10K race, you will likely be able to walk for at least 30 minutes at a slow or moderate pace. Keep in mind that even though you are aging, you should still make every effort possible to include stretching, aerobic activity, and strength training into your regular physical activities. Many exercises can even be done from the comfort and convenience of your own home.

Here are some tips to help even the most sedentary older adult become more active:

  • Join a gym. If possible, look for a gym with a pool. Most gyms will offer water aerobics classes that are designed specifically for older adults. Water aerobics will help to relieve pressure on your joints as you stretch and work your body.

  • Enlist a personal trainer. Personal trainers are available at most gyms or through private means. Your personal trainer can design a physical fitness routine around your lifestyle and constrictions. He or she can even find exercises that you can do from the comfort of your living room!
  • Find a buddy. The buddy system is not only a way to stay accountable to your exercise routine, but working out with a friend will likely make exercising fun.
  • “Borrow” the grandkids for a few hours. Spending time outdoors or at a museum with the grandkids can help to not only entertain you, but your grandkids will likely encourage you to keep up with their active lifestyles.
  • Run errands. Though it may be tempting, avoid letting loved ones do your shopping and other errands for you. You will benefit by staying active – even if staying active only means picking up the dry cleaning or groceries.

Remember: even as older adults, the principles that make up a healthy lifestyle still apply. Regular exercise leads to a stronger heart, improved blood circulation, limber muscles, and reduced stress. Simple, consistent exercise can add years to your life and can stave off the development of Diabetes complications.

Sample Physical Activity Schedules for Healthy Older Adults

The following sample schedules show how you can incorporate flexibility, cardio-respiratory, and strength components into your physical activity routine. Doing activities in all three areas on a regular basis is an important part of a balanced physical activity plan.

If you are not accustomed to regular physical activity, the sample schedule below will give you an idea of how to get started. Remember to start slowly and gradually increase the frequency, intensity, and time of your activities as they become easier. Click here fore more tips on how to get started. These exercises can be modified to suit your limitations and comfort level.

Beginners:

 

Flexibility

Cardio-

respiratory

Strength

Sunday

 

Walk for 15 minutes

 

Monday

Stretching

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

Work in the yard

Wednesday

Tai Chi

Gardening

 

Thursday

 

 

Lift weights

Friday

Stretching

 

 

Saturday

 

Clean the house

 

If you are already relatively active, the schedule below is an example of one you might provide more of a challenge for you.

Moderate:

 

Flexibility

Cardio-

respiratory

Strength

Sunday

Stretching

Walk for 30 minutes

 

Monday

Stretching

Dance class

Lift weights (arms)

Tuesday

Tai Chi

Walk at the mall or park

Work in the yard

Wednesday

Stretching

Gardening

Chair exercises

Thursday

Yoga

Walk with a friend

Lift weights (legs)

Friday

Stretching

Take an aerobics class

Chair exercises

Saturday

Stretching

Clean the house

Work in the yard

For more information about strength training as an older adult, visit the Center for Disease control by clicking here.

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